Fluid Exposure Protocol: Reno

Department of Student Affairs

Reno Campus and All Medical School Outpatient Facilities Statewide:

Priority Exposure

Requires immediate medical attention and laboratory work. These exposures include percutaneous injury with:

  • Large bore hollow needles
  • Deep puncture wounds
  • Visible blood on needle or device used in patient's artery or vein
  • Any exposure with an HIV positive patient should be considered a high priority
For Priority Exposures
  1. Report the exposure immediately to your attending physician and/or resident. If the exposure is non-priority, it is not necessary to obtain laboratory work in the emergency room of the facility.
  2. Complete the School of Medicine incident form.
  3. Obtain laboratory work as soon as possible following the exposure. If necessary, in the emergency department of the facility.
  4. Do not allow the hospital or clinic to file a worker's compensation report. Students are not eligible for worker's compensation and the filing of a report will delay processing of insurance claims.
  5. Contact the Student Health Center (775) 784-6598 to report the exposure and schedule follow up treatment.

Non Priority Exposure

Do not require immediate medical attention and laboratory work. These exposures include:

  • Solid needle (suture needle) percutaneous injury
  • Superficial injury
  • Blood or fluid splash to mucous membranes or skin
For Non-priority Exposures
  1. Report the exposure immediately to your attending physician and/or resident. If the exposure is non-priority, it is not necessary to obtain laboratory work in the emergency room of the facility.
  2. Complete the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine incident form.
  3. Do not allow the hospital or clinic to file a worker's compensation report. Students are not eligible for worker's compensation and the filing of a report will delay processing of insurance claims.
  4. Contact the Student Health Center (775) 784-6598 to schedule an appointment for follow up treatment within three days of the exposure.