Logo File Types and When to Use Them

Brand and Style Guide 2016

EPS (Vector Image): For Print

Vector logos are Adobe Illustrator format and are infinitely scalable, giving you maximum flexibility. EPS logo files should always be used for materials that will be printed either in-house or professionally, which includes paper-printed items (e.g., brochures, posters, business cards), branding pieces (e.g., vinyl banners, signage), swag (e.g., shirts, pens, bags, mugs), and printed advertising (e.g., magazine or newsprint and billboards).

Here is a breakdown of when to use each color version:

CMYK version (also known as 4-Color, full-color, 4C, positive)

This is the preferred logo and should be used the majority of the time. It should be used for pieces that use full-color printing (e.g., brochures, advertising, collateral, etc.) The logo is considered a positive logo and should be used on white or light backgrounds.

Black-Gray and Black versions (positive)

These logos should be used when printing in grayscale (black and white materials). The logo is considered a positive logo and should be used on white or light backgrounds. The Black-Gray version is preferred but should not be used if it is on a background that makes it illegible. In such case, use the Black version.

White version (also known as a reversed logo)

The white, or reversed, logo should be used on dark backgrounds, such as UNR blue. This version should be used any time the positive logos are illegible on any material. Therefore, it may be used on printed pieces, advertising, swag, etc.

PMS versions (spot color printing, positive)

  • PMS282C – Blue (For one-color printing)
  • PMS282C – PMS877C - Blue & Silver (For two-color printing)
  • PMS282C – PMSCoolGrey10C - Blue & Gray (For two-color printing)

PMS logo versions are only meant to be used for professional, spot color printing with Pantone ink (i.e., one-color printing or two-color printing). That means those are the only colors being printed on the materials. Examples of use would be for professionally-printed letterhead, business cards, swag, etc. We recommend only using PMS values when the printer is specifically requesting them (meaning they are printing in Pantone). More often than not though, printers will be using CMYK. Pantone printing is done with specific inks and therefore do no show up accurately on screen (digitally) or printed on a full-color (CMYK) printer. These logos are considered positive logos and should be used on white or light backgrounds.

JPEG (Raster Image): For Microsoft Programs

JPEG logos are ideal for use in such programs such as Microsoft Word, PowerPoint and other common software programs. These should not be used on any professionally-printed materials. JPEGs are a raster image type. Because raster images are constructed using a fixed number of colored pixels, they can't be dramatically resized without compromising their resolution. JPEGs cannot have a transparent background so each of these logo versions have a white background and should only be used on white backgrounds.

Here is a breakdown of when to use each color version:

  • RGB Large (300 dpi): Use for full-color printing (e.g., Microsoft Word)
  • RGB Small (72 dpi): Use for full-color viewing on digital materials (e.g., Powerpoint)
  • Black-Gray Large (300 dpi): Use for grayscale printing (e.g., Microsoft Word)
  • Black-Gray Small (72 dpi): Use for grayscale viewing on digital materials (e.g., Powerpoint)

PNG (Raster Image with Transparency): For Web

PNG logos are ideal for web projects. They maintain transparency so they can be placed on different color backgrounds. These should not be used on any professionally-printed materials. PNGs are also a raster image type. Because raster images are constructed using a fixed number of colored pixels, they can't be dramatically resized without compromising their resolution.

  • RGB Small (72 dpi): Use for full-color web projects
  • Black-Gray Small (72 dpi): Use for grayscale web projects
  • White Small (72 dpi): Use for web projects with dark backgrounds