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Nevada Front Page

School of Medicine in the News


Match Day for UNR Med medical students

• KTVN Channel 2 News

A cool moment for University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine medical students, today, who learned where they will be spending their residencies. The Match Day tradition involves around 18,000 medical students across the country. Because of the pandemic, the medical students got their results vitually, this year.


UNR medical student coming home to begin residency in Las Vegas

• Fox 5 News Las Vegas

There's few fewer days more special for medical students than the third Friday in March, also known as match day. Its a day where students graduating from medical school learn where they will be completing their residency after school. Today, one University of Nevada Reno graduate, got the call she had been hoping for. Munachi Ndukwu will be completing her residency at the UNLV School of Medicine. Ndukwu was born and raised in Las Vegas, and is beyond excited to return to Southern Nevada.


Q&A: Could I sign up for a specific vaccine?

• Las Vegas Review Journal

“The longer we kind of allow infection to go on in the community, the more chance for these (coronavirus) variants to arise and to take hold,” said Dr. Mark Riddle, associate dean of clinical research at the School of Medicine at the University of Nevada, Reno, and a vaccine consultant to the World Health Organization and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. ”Nationally and locally, we ought to be trying to really vaccinate as quickly as possible as many people as possible, so that these variants don’t take hold,” Riddle said.



Nevada Increases Eligibility for COVID-19 Vaccines

• KTVN Channel 2 News

"The longer we allow infection to go on in the community, the more chance for these variants to rise and to take hold," Dr. Mark Riddle, Associate Chief of Staff for Research at the VA Sierra Nevada Health Care System said.


Vaccine expert joins COVID-19 weekly update, discusses reactions to doses

• KTNV ABC 13 Las Vegas

Today, Mark Riddle, M.D., Dr.P.H., Associate Dean of Clinical Research and Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Nevada Reno, School of Medicine and Associate Chief of Staff for Research at the VA - Sierra Nevada Health Care System in Reno and, will join Caleb Cage, Nevada COVID-19 Response Director, on their call with the members of the media.


Experts: Avoid brand “shopping” for COVID-19 vaccine

• This is Reno

On Friday, Cage was joined by Dr. Mark Riddle, associate dean of clinical research at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine, for a briefing with the media. Riddle is an active consultant to the World Health Organization and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation on enteric vaccines and the site principal investigator for the Janssen/J & J COVID-19 vaccine study at the VA Sierra Nevada Health Care System in Reno. Riddle joined Cage to discuss differences between the three emergency approved vaccines—Janssen, Pfizer and Moderna—explaining that each of them is effective. He also stressed, like other health experts, that people should accept whichever among the three is available when they become eligible to be vaccinated.


New UNR Study Reveals Public's View On Vaccines

• KTVN Channel 2 News

"Even though we can build a vaccine, will people take it once you build it," asked University of Nevada, Reno Doctor of Preventive Medicine and Public Health Dr. Mark Riddle. The question of whether Nevadans trust the efficacy and safety of the Coronavirus vaccines came out in a study from University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine.


Officials: Some Vaccination Slots Going Unused in Vegas Area

• U.S. News & World Report

A study released Tuesday by University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine researchers charted an increase in the number of people saying they would likely get the vaccine once it becomes available to them — up to 73% in January from 64% in December. Dr. Mark Riddle, primary study investigator, said the results might reflect increased public confidence that vaccines are safe and effective and that people who have been hesitant are changing their minds.


Officials: Some vaccination slots going unused in Vegas area

• East Oregonian

A study released Tuesday by University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine researchers charted an increase in the number of people saying they would likely get the vaccine once it becomes available to them — up to 73% in January from 64% in December. Dr. Mark Riddle, primary study investigator, said the results might reflect increased public confidence that vaccines are safe and effective and that people who have been hesitant are changing their minds.


Officials: Some vaccination slots going unused in Las Vegas area

• Fox 5 Las Vegas

A study released Tuesday by University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine researchers charted an increase in the number of people saying they would likely get the vaccine once it becomes available to them — up to 73% in January from 64% in December. Dr. Mark Riddle, primary study investigator, said the results might reflect increased public confidence that vaccines are safe and effective and that people who have been hesitant are changing their minds.


New UNR Study Reveals Public's View On Vaccines

• KTVN Channel 2 News

"Even though we can build a vaccine, will people take it once you build it," asked University of Nevada, Reno Doctor of Preventive Medicine and Public Health Dr. Mark Riddle. The question of whether Nevadans trust the efficacy and safety of the Coronavirus vaccines came out in a study from University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine


Statewide survey shows 73 percent of Nevadans likely to get COVID-19 vaccine when available

• Carson Now

Researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine, in partnership with the University of Nevada, Reno School of Community Health Sciences, Immunize Nevada, and the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services, released the latest findings from an ongoing study to learn what Nevadans think about COVID-19 vaccines, and their acceptance toward taking the vaccine — once one is available to them.


UNR Med Professor contributes to report on “Creating an Anti-racist Cardiovascular Community”

• KOLO Channel 8 News

Statistics show Hispanic and Black Americans have higher rates and worse outcomes of cardiovascular disease. A local cardiologist has collaborated with other doctors around the nation to not just write an article about ending systemic racism and micro-aggressions in her field, but she is calling on her colleagues to do the same. This is all in an effort to bring in more doctors of color and build more trust amongst minorities. “What we’ve written here are low hanging fruit. Things that don’t cost money, that don’t require huge structural changes and yet can have a big impact,” Dr. Lorrel Toft explains.


Against the odds

• The Nevada Independent

The last year laid bare Nevada’s chronic underfunding of public health systems, a lack of investment in aging state infrastructure, including its unemployment system and continued economic overreliance on the tourism industry. It also saw resilience in the face of despair.


UNR researchers say titanium coating has an impact on the coronavirus

• KOLO Channel 8 News

At the Center for Molecular Medicine, the coating is placed on a glass surface. Then droplets of the coronavirus were placed on top. In one dish a control group is present to compare a treated and untreated surface. “All of them were inactivated in a very brief exposure of the UV light,” says Professor Subhash Verma of the viruses on the treated glass. Verma is an Associate Professor of Microbiology with the University of Nevada Reno, School of Medicine. Dr. Verma says ultimately the titanium coating could be placed in a spray to treat surfaces. Or it could be put in building materials—all to keep the virus at bay.





Is Nevada's leading COVID-19 expert hopeful about ending the pandemic? Maybe

• Reno Gazette Journal

Pandori, who leads the Nevada State Laboratory on the University of Nevada, Reno campus, is almost as new to Nevada as the virus. He jumped into the role in November 2019 and today, over a year later, is brutally skeptical about the future — and the eradication of COVID-19. “This pandemic isn’t going to one day just disappear,” he said, despite the miraculous speed of two vaccines and the hope they control the spread. Pandori is part mad scientist, in the best sense of the description. What he says is often gospel to the likes of Gov. Steve Sisolak and Washoe County Health District Officer Kevin Dick.


A Year In The Pandemic: KUNR Special Coverage

• KUNR

This week marks a year since the first presumptive positive COVID-19 case was announced in Nevada. Since then, Nevadans have endured the upheaval the pandemic has caused in their lives. isten to “A Year In The Pandemic,” a one-hour special hosted by KUNR's Anh Gray and Lucia Starbuck. This KUNR special first aired on Wednesday, March 3. Dr. Mark Pandori, director, Nevada State Public Health Laboratory can be heard from minutes 38 - 41 in the segment.


A WHAT transplant? It’s true — No. 2 can be No. 1 at saving lives

• Green Valley News

“Our bodies have evolved in cooperation with our microbiome, which is a constellation of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other organisms. And we are dependent upon them to help us digest food, and develop our immune responses and prevent diseases,” said Dr. Mark Riddle, who studies the gut microbiome at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine.


California coronavirus variant among those spreading in Nevada

• Las Vegas Review Journal

The director of Nevada’s public health lab isn’t too worried yet about a new pair of coronavirus variants first detected in California, despite one researcher there stating that “the devil is here” following the discovery.