Page 9
Nevada Front Page

School of Medicine in the News

From housing to skimpy services: Area experts trace systemic health risks

• Nevada Current

Over the past decade Nevada has seen steady growth in the number of licensed health professionals, including the addition of almost 900 doctors over the past two years, said John Packham, associate dean for the Office of Statewide Initiatives at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine.


Study Finds Oral Palate Differences in Patients With Schizophrenia

• Decisions in Dentistry

New research from the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine (UNR Med) and University of Maryland School of Dentistry (UMSOD) suggests patients with deficit schizophrenia have a wider oral palate than people with other forms of the disease, as well as those without the mental disorder.



Young women pursuing STEM careers

• KTVN Channel 2 News

Local northern Nevada high school girls got to learn hands-on, today, with power tools, pins, clams and rods as a part of a program that teaches young girls about the importance of going into orthopedic surgery and engineering.


Rural Health Day addresses challenges

• Elko Daily Free Press

The University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine Office of Statewide Initiatives, Nevada State Office of Rural Health and Nevada Rural Hospital Partners hosted CEOs and clinicians from 15 rural Nevada communities at a Rural Health Day event this week to address the challenges and solutions to the statewide shortage of primary care doctors and specialists.



Study Finds Oral Palate Differences in Patients With Schizophrenia

• Decisions in Dentistry

New research from the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine (UNR Med) and University of Maryland School of Dentistry (UMSOD) suggests patients with deficit schizophrenia have a wider oral palate than people with other forms of the disease, as well as those without the mental disorder.


UNR Med, Carson Tahoe Health form partnership

• Northern Nevada Business View

Following a collaborative recruitment between the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine and Carson Tahoe Health, Lorrel Toft, M.D., F.A.C.C., a cardiovascular critical care physician and researcher, was recently hired as an associate professor for UNR Med’s Department of Internal Medicine, as well as a cardiologist on staff with Carson Tahoe Health.


Omega-3 fatty acids with statin therapy reduce major adverse CV events

• Healio Cardiology Today

“Overall, this study demonstrated that EPA (in a higher dose, 1,800 mg/day) in conjunction with standard statin therapy could be a very promising drug in preventing major adverse CV events and, therefore, it should be added to the conventional statin therapy at a very early phase for maximal benefits,” Rajkumar Doshi, MD, MPH, internal medicine resident physician at University of Nevada Reno School of Medicine, and colleagues wrote. “This is especially important, as EPA has mild to none documented side effects but shown to have significant favorable profile as shown in this study.”


UNR Med and Carson Tahoe Health form partnership

• Nevada Appeal

Following a collaborative recruitment between the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine and Carson Tahoe Health, Lorrel Toft, M.D., F.A.C.C., a cardiovascular critical care physician and researcher, has been recruited as an associate professor for UNR Med’s Department of Internal Medicine as well as a cardiologist on staff with Carson Tahoe Health.



We should be using less antibiotics’ for traveler’s diarrhea

• Healio Gastroenterology

In this exclusive video from the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting, Mark S. Riddle, M.D., of the University of Nevada Reno, School of Medicine, discusses his presentation on the effects of single-dose antibiotics on the microbiome in traveler’s diarrhea.

KKOH report: Healthy Nevada Speaker Series

• KKOH 780 AM

Next month, psychologist and New York Times bestselling author Adam Alter will discuss how much time screens steal from us, what's keeping us hooked on technology and ways to strike a healthy balance with tech at UNR Med's Healthy Nevada Speaker Series, Nov. 18.


Critical care physician named to cardiovascular clinical faculty in UNR Med, Carson Tahoe Health partnership

• Carson Now

Following a collaborative recruitment between the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine and Carson Tahoe Health, Lorrel Toft, M.D., F.A.C.C., a cardiovascular critical care physician and researcher, has been recruited as an associate professor for UNR Med’s Department of Internal Medicine as well as a cardiologist on staff with Carson Tahoe Health.


New recommendations for the Whooping Cough Vaccine

• KOLO Channel 8 News

“There is some data that shows that protection can wane by half 50% after 6 to 8 years,” says Dr. Steven Zell, a professor with UNR Med in Primary Care. “So we may even see in the future, a re-visitation of this policy that when they get their TDAP at 11 maybe before they graduate they get a booster. Specifically if they are going to enter college and intermingle with a lot of other people of a youthful age,” says Dr. Zell.


KTVN Health Watch: Tdap and DTaP vaccines

• KTVN Channel 2 News

UNR Med's Dr. Steven Zell, professor, Internal Medicine, explains the difference between the Tdap and DTaP vaccines.


Q & A: Palate Significantly Wider in People With Schizophrenia With Primary Negative Symptoms

• Psychiatry & Behavioral Health Learning Network

Brian Kirkpatrick, MD, chair of the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine, and Gary Hack, DDS, associate professor, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, discuss their findings that people with schizophrenia with primary negative symptoms, known as deficit schizophrenia, had significantly wider oral palates compared with patients with nondeficit schizophrenia as well as control subjects.



Study Finds Orofacial Differences in People With Deficit Schizophrenia

• Psychiatry &Behavioral Health Learning Network

People with schizophrenia with primary negative symptoms, known as deficit schizophrenia, had significantly wider oral palates compared with patients with nondeficit schizophrenia as well as control subjects in a study published online in Schizophrenia Bulletin.


Democrats debate which proposal is best to tackle rural hospital crisis

• CBS News

"For starters, you're dealing with really low volume," Dr. John Packham, an associate dean researching rural healthcare at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine, told CBS News. "Some of the hospitals that I work with, literally have two or three inpatients a day but you nonetheless have to staff it for nursing 24/7. You have to have lab and radiology available."



Woman details becoming a doctor 25 years after medical school

• NBC Today Show 3rd Hour

Suzanne Watson wanted to be a doctor since she was a little girl, but that dream was deferred when she wed and started having children. She eventually discovered another calling, becoming a priest, but that same desire to pursue medicine persisted. She tells the 3rd hour of TODAY how she ended up making that dream a reality.


World Mental Health Day

• KTVN Channel 2 News

Suicide has been a growing problem, worldwide, says UNR Med faculty physician Allison Cotton. According to the World Health Organization, a person around the world dies by suicide every 40 seconds. Reno Behavioral Health is working to give people psychiatric programs to help combat mental health issues and depression.


REPORT: Montage shooter was hallucinating from Kratom derivative, Whip-Its, meth

• This is Reno

Lucas Stone, who shot nearly 50 rounds from the Montage in downtown Reno in November 2017 was hallucinating due to mixing drugs. Consuming a combination of alcohol, meth, Kratom and nitrous oxide is incredibly risky, said Iain Buxton, a professor of pharmacology at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine.


Scientists find unique body part in people with schizophrenia

• Knowridge Science Report

In a new study, researchers found evidence that points to physical differences among groups of people with schizophrenia. They found patients suffering from a specific form of schizophrenia have a wider oral palate. The research was conducted by a team from the University of Nevada Reno and the University of Maryland.