Health Education

Student studying in knowledge center

Below you will find a list of health and wellness topics to assist you in learning more about your health.  If you have any questions or would like to be seen at the Student Health Center, please call us at 775-784-6598.

  • Acne

    Overview

    Acne is a common condition, which typically starts in adolescence. Acne results from the plugging of oil gland pores with sloughed off dead skin cells and bacteria. It can occur on the face, upper chest, back and shoulders. It may be hereditary or influenced by hormones.

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Blackheads
    • Non-tender or mildly tender pink bumps or papules, commonly called "pimples"
    • Tender pustules
    • Firmer or nodulocystic lesions, which often leave scars or spots

    Prevention

    • Maintain a nutrition diet with regular mealtimes. Get sufficient sleep and regular exercise
    • Avoid drugs, caffeine, and alcohol
    • Wear clean, loose fitting clothing
    • Avoid sitting and sleeping with hands to the face
    • Avoid squeezing, picking, or scrubbing too vigorously
    • Any skin care products should be labeled "non-comedogenic"

    Treatment

    • Medications such as tretinoin (Retin A), Differin and Tazorac are the most effective at preventing plugging of pores
    • Benzoyl peroxides may also help by killing bacteria and by increasing turnover of skin cells. Benzoyl peroxide can be found in both prescription and non-prescription forms. It comes in a liquid, cream, or gel form. Use as directed.
    • Antibiotics for short term treatment
    • Accutane or Amnesteem are powerful oral retinoid medications that may be used in some cases. These medications are costly and can have many side effects.
    • How we can help
    • If you would like to be seen by our medical staff or dermatologist, please contact us to schedule an appointment.

    Resources

  • Anger Management

    Overview

    Anger is a basic human emotion that everyone faces; however the expression of anger is something we learn and can always reflect on. Because we learn how to express anger, we can also learn how to choose our reactions rather than automatically respond. By drawing attention to the physiological sensations of your body it may be easier to identify when you are angry and how to best address these feelings.

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Direct signs: A surge of energy, raised voice, yelling, cursing, headaches, stomach aches, tightness in the throat, increased heart rate or blood pressure, or feelings of violence
    • Indirect signs may also be present, such as chronic fatigue, anxiety, sulking, loss of appetite, hostile joking, and/or abuse of alcohol or drugs
    • Prevention and Treatment
    • Learning to recognize your personal signs and symptoms of anger and actively controlling your response
    • Techniques to remain calm such as counting to 10, and deep and/or slow breathing
    • Removing yourself from a situation that makes you angry is the best way to manage an anger response – try returning to the situation once you feel calm enough to express yourself effectively

    Resources

  • Asthma

    Overview

    Asthma is a commonly treated inflammatory lung disease usually caused by something irritating the airways such as a viral or bacterial infection, allergies, or environmental pollution. It usually requires a visit to your health care provider and medications, however the severity can vary from person to person and from one episode to another. An asthma attack can come on gradually or suddenly and can become life threatening if not managed with assistance from a provider.

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Shortness of breath
    • Tightness in the chest
    • Wheezing, whistling or hissing sound when breathing
    • Persistent cough

    Prevention

    • Understand your symptoms and triggers and learn to recognize them early
    • Avoid allergens and pollutants both indoors and outdoors
    • Take prescribed medications to manage symptoms

    Treatment

    • Long term prescribed medications used regularly to prevent attacks
    • Treat underlying irritant such as allergies and/or infection

    Resources

  • Chlamydia

    Overview

    Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, affecting about three million Americans each year. It is caused by the Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria and can cause infertility if left untreated, however can be easily cured if addressed. Chlamydia is transmitted primarily during vaginal or anal sex and can infect the vagina, cervix, urethra, fallopian tubes, rectum, lining of the eyelid, and/or the throat.

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Chlamydia often presents with little to no symptoms; 75% of women and 50% of men show no symptoms of infection
    • Men - can experience burning or pain with urination, pain or swelling of the testicles, and/or discharge from the penis
    • Women - can experience burning with urination, vaginal discharge, non-menstrual or irregular bleeding, and/or pain in the lower abdomen

    Prevention

    • As signs and symptoms are often not present, regular routine screenings are important for sexually active individuals
    • Always use preferred protection method during intercourse such as condoms
    • Mutually monogamous sexual relationships and open discussion with potential partners

    Treatment

    • Antibiotics prescribed by a provider.  Both partners should be seen by a provider and complete treatment
    • Retesting 3 months after antibiotic treatment to check for reinfection

    Resources

  • Cold and Flu

    Influenza (Flu)

    This is a respiratory illness with symptoms including: fever greater than 100 degrees, headache, fatigue, sore throat, cough, runny or congested nose, and body aches. In some individuals, diarrhea and vomiting may also occur.

    How the Flu Spreads:

    The flu spreads in respiratory droplets when people who are infected cough or sneeze. The flu virus can live for up to 8 hours on surfaces and can also be spread by touching surfaces with influenza virus on it and then touching eyes, nose, or mouth. Individuals are contagious for 1 day prior to the development of symptoms and up to 24 hours after fever has resolved.

    Steps to help prevent the spread of the flu:

    Wash your hands frequently, cover your coughs and sneezes, avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth, and don't share food, drink, or utensils. If you live with other students, frequently clean commonly used surfaces such as doorknobs, keyboards, and bathroom areas. Try to avoid close contact with sick people. If you are ill with flu like symptoms, stay home until 24 hours after your fever is gone. Eat well, get enough sleep, and exercise regularly!
    Vaccination: Getting vaccinated is one of the best ways to protect yourself against the flu. The vaccine is available at the Student Health Center. There is no charge for the vaccine.

    Antivirals:

    Prescription antiviral medications are available and can be helpful in certain circumstances. These medications are not a cure for the flu, but can help lessen the severity of the symptoms.

    Treatment:

    Many people with the flu will not need to seek a doctor's care. Self care with fluids, rest, Tylenol or ibuprofen (no aspirin) may be all that is needed. Faculty, staff, or students who are ill with the flu should stay home (or in their dorm room) for 24 hours after they are fever free without the use of fever reducing medications. A mild cough may persist; however, the cough should not prevent students from returning to class. Pregnant women, young children, and those with diabetes, asthma, heart disease, or immune deficiencies with flu like symptoms should consult a physician or the Student Health Center. Anyone having symptoms such as difficulty breathing, chest or abdominal pain, sudden dizziness, confusion, or severe or persistent vomiting should seek immediate care. 
    More Information: More information about the flu is available at the following website

    http://www.cdc.gov/flu

    Overview

    Colds are contagious, but usually minor infections of the mucous membranes of the nose, sinuses, and throat. Colds can be caused by many different viruses. Influenza (i.e. the Flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses infecting the nose, throat, and lungs. The flu can cause mild to severe illness, where as a cold can be considered mild and nonlife threatening.

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Symptoms of a cold and the flu have some commonalities but it is important to know the differences and when to be seen by a doctor
    • Symptoms of a cold include runny nose, head congestion, sneezing, sore throat, cough, and the occasional low grade fever
    • Symptoms of the flu include fever or chills, cough, sore throat, runny/stuffy nose, muscle aches, headaches, fatigue (feeling very tired), and occasionally vomiting and diarrhea

    Prevention

    • Preventing a cold can often be difficult in dense living situations but the following precautions can help to reduce your risk - wash hands often with soap and water, keep hands away from nose and mouth, reduce stress levels, get adequate rest and exercise, and stop smoking (smoking lowers resistance to all respiratory infections)
    • Receiving a flu vaccine each year can help prevent the Flu. Additionally, preventative actions are recommended to reduce risk, such as frequent hand washing, covering coughs and sneezes, and staying away from people who are sick.

    Treatment

    • If you have a cold, the best form of treatment is managing symptoms until your body's own immune system eliminates the virus. Antibiotic medications do not cure viral infections like a cold but there are treatment options to get through your cold
    • Cold and Flu: drink extra liquids (water especially), allow proper rest time to decrease the length of your cold, cough drops can help soothe a sore throat and reduce coughing, and avoid smoking, caffeine, and alcohol. Some over the counter medications can assist in relieving your cold such as a decongestant for a stuffy nose, and ibuprofen or acetaminophen for body aches, headache, and fever.
    • Flu: When managing symptoms at home, the treatment options for a cold can also be used to manage the flu. Be sure to visit your provider if flu symptoms persist (fever over 101F, nausea, vomiting, and severe body aches). Influenza antiviral drugs that can be used to treat flu illness when appropriate.

    Resources

  • Depression

    Overview

    While everyone faces loss and setbacks leaving them sad or blue, depression is qualitatively and quantitatively different from a normal reaction to setbacks and disappointments. Depression lasts longer and is generally more pervasive than normal feelings of sadness, however depression often presents differently from person to person.

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Loss of interest or pleasure in normally satisfying activities is the most generalized central feature of depression however based on severity and the individual, the following symptoms may also be present
    • Feeling sad, hopeless, worthless, and/or guilty
    • Significant weight loss/gain or significant decrease/increase in appetite
    • Changes in sleep patterns, excessive sleeping or not enough
    • Thoughts of hopelessness and/or suicidal thoughts

    Prevention

    • Relying on those around you, a social support network, in friends and family
    • Maintaining self-care practices such as relaxation time, regular sleep patterns, exercise routine, and maintaining a healthy diet

    Treatment

    • While depression is a highly treatable condition, 2 out of 3 depressed college students never seek treatment.
    • Do not try to treat depression on your own - depression can often interfere with clear thinking, so it is important to involve others
    • Treatment can be very effective in reducing the length and severity of depression as well as helping to better understand your own signs and symptoms
    • Sometimes, treatment for depression combines psychotherapy with antidepressant medication

    Resources

  • Disordered Eating

    Overview

    Eating disorders are a group of conditions in which food and weight preoccupy your thoughts and often consume your life. Eating disorders can cause serious physical and mental health issues and, at their most severe, can be life-threatening. Eating disorders are psychological illnesses in which persons become obsessed with food and with body weight.

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Obsessing about specific body flaws or body image
    • Weighing yourself frequently and judging yourself by the number on the scale
    • Obsessing about food, weight, and fitness levels in private and/or in public
    • Distorted body image and dieting are thought to contribute to eating disorders

    Prevention

    • Try to refrain from being overly critical of body image and remind yourself what it is you like about your appearance
    • Break the habit of comparing yourself to others in terms of appearance
    • Strive to value yourself for strengths besides appearances; are you intelligent, witty, kind, artistic, etc?

    Treatment

    • Psychological counseling can be effective in the treatment of eating disorders and often assist in the development of positive self image
    • Nutritional counseling can also assist in maintenance of healthy dieting and exercise
    • Medical management by a physician

    Resources

  • Headaches

    Overview

    Migraine headaches are periodic attacks of intense pain on one or both sides of the head. If untreated, they typically last between 4 and 72 hours. Tension headaches are more common than migraine headaches however the cause of each can be varied between people. Many factors can contribute to the development of tension and/or migraine headaches such as diet, sleep, physical activity, and psychological issues such as stress

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Moderate to severe pulsing or throbbing pain
    • Pain that worsens with physical activity
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Sensitivity to light or sounds and possibly visual disturbances that immediately precede the headache

    Prevention

    • Avoidance of any identifiable trigger factors
    • Regular exercise and healthy diet
    • Stress management techniques

    Treatment

    • Pain relieving medications such as Ibuprofen, aspirin, Excedrin, and/or Aleve taken as soon as the headache begins
    • Quiet, darkened room as well as a cool compress placed on the head or eyes
    • Provider prescribed medications may be necessary to alleviate more severe cases

    Resources

  • Heartburn

    Overview

    Heartburn occurs when stomach acid backs up into the esophagus and is felt as a burning pain in your chest, just behind your breastbone and is often worse when lying down or bending over. Occasional heartburn is common and no cause for alarm, however heartburn that is more frequent or interferes with your daily routine may be a symptom of another condition that may require medical attention.

    Signs and Symptoms

    • A burning pain in the chest that usually occurs after eating
    • If you are experiencing severe chest pain or pressure, especially with other signs/symptoms such as pain in the arm or jaw, or difficulty breathing be sure to seek immediate medical help, as these may be signs of a heart attack

    Prevention

    • Certain foods and drinks can be a trigger and should be avoided to prevent heartburn. Foods such as extra spicy food, onions, citrus products, tomato products such as ketchup, fatty or fried foods, peppermint, chocolate, alcohol, carbonated beverages, coffee, large or fatty meals can be triggers depending on the person.
    • Being overweight, pregnant, or overly stressed can also increase risk of experiencing heartburn
    • Maintaining a regular diet and exercise routine can help to prevent regular heartburn

    Treatment

    • Seek medical consultation for heartburn if it occurs more than twice a week, symptoms persist despite use of over-the-counter medications, you have difficulty swallowing, and/or nausea and vomiting associated with your heartburn

    Resources

  • HPV/Cervical Health

    Overview

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a common sexually transmitted infection that causes genital warts. HPV can be transmitted by vaginal, oral, and/or anal sex and is easily spread by close skin-to-skin contact, often infecting the vulva, vagina, cervix, rectum, penis, and scrotum. An infected person who does not show symptoms or visible lesions can still spread the disease, however the highest likelihood of transmission is when these lesions/warts are present. Certain types of HPV are also linked to the development of cervical cancer.

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Skin colored, pink, or white lesions may occur in genital or anal areas which are often raised and smooth or bumpy in appearance.
    • Most cases of HPV infection do not have any symptoms however these lesions may appear within several weeks of sexual activity or may take years to appear

    Prevention

    • The HPV vaccine helps to prevent 90% of the HPV that causes genital warts and 70% of the HPV that causes cervical cancer and is effective in both men and women
    • Using condoms (only protects skin covered by the condom)
    • Mutually monogamous relationships and regular STI testing
    • Stop smoking - smokers are more likely to develop HPV and more likely to have HPV recur

    Treatment

    • There is no cure for HPV related genital warts however lesions may be removed via multiple methods by your health care provider
    • Home treatment is available by prescription to aid in the reduction of lesions

    Resources

  • Meningitis

    Overview

    Meningococcal Meningitis is an infection of the membranes and cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord usually caused by a viral or bacterial infection. Viral Meningitis is less severe and usually resolves without treatment, however bacterial Meningitis is rare and often severe. College students have an increased risk of meningococcal disease, which is associated with social environments and close living arrangements to others. Bacterial Meningitis is contagious and spread through the exchange of respiratory and throat secretions (via coughing/kissing) and individuals in direct contact or close living quarters are at a much higher risk for infection

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Fever, Severe Headache, Stiff Neck
    • Confusion, Sleepiness
    • Nausea and Vomiting
    • Seizures

    Prevention

    • There are two types of vaccination for bacterial meningitis:
    • Vaccine for strains ACWY called Menactra or Menomune
    • Vaccine for Meningitis B called Trumenba or Bexero
    • All incoming freshman under the age of 23 must show evidence of having been vaccinated for Meningitis strains ACWY (Menomune or Menactra)
    • Students are also encouraged to get vaccinated for Meningitis B, but it is not required (Trumenba or Bexero)

    Treatment

    • Bacterial Meningitis can be effectively treated with antibiotics, however it is very important to begin treatment as early as possible

    Resources

  • Missing Home

    Overview

    Homesickness is a common experience many students may feel when they first arrive at UNR. Being away from the comfort of home and adjusting to a new environment can leave students feeling nostalgic and longing for the familiarity of home. Homesickness is extremely common, but the degree or severity can be very different so it is important to notice if your homesickness is impacting your normal routine

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Withdrawing from friends and/or social activities
    • Constant thoughts about home or the familiar
    • Physical symptoms such as headaches, stomach aches, and/or uncontrollable/frequent crying

    Prevention and Treatment

    • Understand that homesickness is very common and recognize the signs that you are struggling with homesickness
    • Speak to friends or family back home openly about your feelings
    • Cook or eat comforting food from home
    • Get involved in your new surroundings, meet new people, and seek support of trusted new friends
  • Relationships

    Overview

    Maintaining a healthy relationship requires good communication between partners. While many college students enter into intimate/non intimate relationships while in school, the quality of the relationships we have affect our lives in many ways, including our self-esteem, our ability to handle stress, and our academic and work-related productivity. It is important to recognize a healthy vs. unhealthy relationship situation and balance between work, school, and relationship aspects of life.

    Building Healthy Relationships

    • Healthy relationships allow for individuality and personal growth, all while bringing out the best in both people. Often, communication is the most effective way of building a healthy relationship for both partners. The following techniques can assist in effective communication with your partner
    • Expressing yourself - "I-statements" to directly and honestly express a feeling without blaming or accusing others
    • Responding - when responding to one another be sure to reflect on their words prior to responding to be sure to better understand the feelings of what the other person just said
    • Compromise - of course, in relationships compromise is king! When both people in a relationship are flexible and willing to compromise the other person relationships are much easier to navigate

    Resources

  • Sexual Assault

    Overview

    Sexual assault, is defined as sexual relations against a person's will and without consent. Any oral, vaginal, or anal sex, sexual touching of the breasts, buttocks, genitalia, etc. that is done so without permission (consent) is considered sexual assault. Consent must be freely and voluntarily given, and must involve positive cooperation. Consent means that all people involved in the act have knowledge and nature of the act and what is going on—this simply means that if anyone involved is unable to provide consent for any reason, the act is considered sexual assault.

    Sexual assault can happen to anyone and can be committed by a stranger or by someone you know. Sexual assault by a friend, date, partner, or casual acquaintance is the most prevalent form of sexual assault on college campuses. Alcohol and other drugs are commonly used in committing sexual assaults—a person who is incapacitated due to drugs or alcohol (or for any other reason) cannot give consent, and these nonconsensual acts are sexual assaults.

    What to Do if You've Just been Sexually Assaulted

    • Get to a safe place, and contact someone who can help you that you feel comfortable with—i.e. a friend, the police (911), or another campus/community agency. The Campus Victim Advocate is a confidential resource that can help. (775) 771-8724
    • Do not shower, eat or drink, or change your clothes. Doing these things may destroy important physical evidence in the event that you decide to prosecute the assailant
    • Contact
    • Seek medical attention—injuries may be hidden and options for preventing pregnancy and/or sexually transmitted diseases should be addressed as soon as possible for your safety
    • Write down everything that you remember happening, with as much detail as possible. This can help with any legal action you may decide to take later on as well as help with the healing process

    Understanding Sexual Assault

    • It is your right to choose whether to report the assault or not. There are several resources that can help you to make an informed decision whether to report right away, after taking time to take care of yourself, or chose to never report the assault—it is your choice!
    • Reactions to sexual assault will vary from person to person. Though each person and situation is unique, the following common reactions to sexual assault may help you to better understand some reactions you or someone you know may experience after a sexual assault—Emotional shock, disbelief, embarrassment, shame, guilt, depression, disorientation, denial, fear, anxiety, anger, and/or physical stress
    • It is important to understand that no matter how much difficulty you are experiencing dealing with assault, your reaction is personal and the recovery process may actually help you develop strengths, insights, and abilities you never knew you had before. Talking about your feelings about the assault may be difficult, however it may also help make you feel better. Your recovery process is entirely your own!

    Resources

  • Sleep

    Overview

    Sleep is an issue that many college students face when balancing stressful or new situations. Sleep disturbances can be the result of anxiety, stress, or physical health issues/conditions. It is important to make sleep a priority especially when managing time in college

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Difficulty falling or staying asleep
    • Excessive tired feeling during the day
    • Difficulty executing tasks and managing time
    • In extreme cases, feelings of delirium or confusion

    Prevention

    • Maintain a regular sleep schedule, attempting to go to sleep and wake up at about the same time every day
    • Maintain healthy diet and exercise routine
    • Develop a bedtime routine to maintain consistency
    • Cut down on drugs, alcohol, and caffeine (especially in the late afternoon onwards)
    • Take a nap—20-30 minute naps have been shown to be beneficial, however longer naps may hinder a regular sleep routine

    Resources

  • STI/STD

    Overview

    A sexually transmitted infection (STI) is any infection that is passed during sexual interactions. STIs can be transmitted during oral, vaginal, and/or anal intercourse. It is important to be aware of the risk factors of sexual behaviors, utilize protection mechanisms, and to get tested regularly.

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Symptoms of STIs vary depending on the infection, and some people may show no symptoms whatsoever
    • Suspected symptoms of an STIs should always be examined by your practitioner to be further treated

    Prevention

    • The risk of transmission of STIs can be greatly reduced by safer sex practices such as:
    • Correct and consistent condom or other protective barrier use
    • Communication with current/potential partners about protection methods, current STI testing status and any history of infection
    • Regular STI testing is recommended to maintain healthy sexual practices

    Treatment

    • Treatment of an STI varies depending on infection and a practitioner should always confirm diagnosis prior to beginning treatment

    Resources

  • Stress Management

    Overview

    While stress is a part of day-to-day life, as a college student stress might be more prevalent when balancing academic demands, adjusting to a new environment, and/or developing new friendships. Stress is not always harmful, however high levels of prolonged stress can result in physical or mental health disturbances

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Feelings of anxiety, fear, irritability, or low self esteem
    • Abnormal behavior such as acting impulsively, increasing use of drugs and alcohol, and/or loss of appetite or over eating
    • Academic impacts such as decreased ability to concentrate and/or store information and difficulties problem solving
    • Increased heartbeat, tiring easily, difficulty sleeping, headaches, and susceptibility to illness

    Prevention and Treatment

    • Getting adequate sleep, maintain healthy diet and exercise routine
    • Avoid excess sugar, caffeine, nicotine, drugs, and alcohol etc.
    • Maintain an emotional outlet and discuss your stress with others
    • Make time for pleasurable activities and relaxation techniques such as exercise or meditation

    Resources

  • Suicide

    Overview

    While we all experience feelings of loneliness, depression, and hopelessness from time to time, each person's emotional state and resources are unique and each of us responds to situations differently. It is important to recognize the signs of suicidal thoughts and actions prior to an attempt in both yourself and those around you.

    Signs and Symptoms

    • While some people may directly make statements that convey their suicidal intentions, others may hint with attitude and statements describing feelings of depression and/or hopelessness.
    • Signs of suicidal thoughts are often similar to those of depression and it is important to recognize those as well:
      • Feeling depressed or sad most of the time
      • Talking or writing about death or suicide
      • Withdrawing from family and friends
      • Feeling hopeless
      • Feeling helpless
      • Feeling strong anger or rage
      • Feeling trapped
      • Giving away possessions
      • Recent loss

    Prevention

    • Most suicides can be prevented by sensitive responses to the person in crisis and if someone you know may be suicidal you should remain calm, directly address the topic of suicide, encourage problem solving and positive actions, and ask for help.
    • Reaching out to professional counselors can often provide the most assistance for yourself or the person you are concerned about
    • How we can help
    • If you would like to be seen by our medical staff or speak with a counselor, please contact us to schedule an appointment.

    Resources

  • Time Management

    Overview

    In college, many students struggle with stress due to time management. Poor time management can be a result of over scheduling, procrastination, distractibility, over accessibility, and/or perfectionism. Often times, time management can have negative effects on physical and/or mental health and decrease success in school and non academic responsibilities

    Signs and Symptoms

    • Feeling overwhelmed or over committed
    • Not having enough time for the activities you once enjoyed
    • Struggling to fit everything into one day or one week that you would like to accomplish

    Prevention

    • Allocate adequate time for school each week by scheduling study times based on your credit load. One guideline can be to allocate two hours outside of class for every hour in class to complete the associated work
    • Treat school like a job; just like a full time career, being a full time student may require 35-55 hours each week
    • Plan your week and term—try utilizing a calendar, weekly planner, or day planner to track tasks and organize commitments outside of school. Keeping an outlined schedule may help you become an effective time manager
  • Tobacco and Electronic Cigarettes

    Overview

    Nicotine is the most addictive substance known to humans, and smoking cigarettes is a very common way to become addicted to nicotine. E-cigarettes contain nicotine along with other harmful chemical. Testing of some e-cigarette products found the vapor to contain known carcinogens and toxic chemicals (such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde). Tobacco use is linked to cardiovascular disease and death, lung cancer, emphysema, 30% of all cancers, and secondary respiratory infections.

    Prevention

    • Don't start smoking, dipping, and/or chewing
    • Recognize the increased risk of developing a habit even when using tobacco casually
    • If you use tobacco products, consider quitting. Most people relapse 4-7 times before a quit attempt is successful so continue to practice quitting

    Treatment

    • Set a quit date and plan strategies to reduce urges such as 5 slow deep breaths, speaking to friends when urges come on, and/or chewing gum or a cinnamon stick
    • Consider nicotine replacement therapies such as gum, lozenges, a patch, or other medications
    • Practice relapse prevention strategies and consider community support resources

    Resources